Captain Black Straps Molasses

FINAL LABEL FINAL

Benefits of Unsulphured blackstrap Molasses

  • 100% natural and safe for humans, animals, insects, plants and soil life.
  • Stimulates the growth of beneficial micro-organisms. A good, quick source of energy for the various forms of microbes and soil life in a compost pile or the soil, because it’s a great source of carbohydrates that stimulates the growth of beneficial microorganisms.
  • Reduces damage to roots caused by root parasites during the process of decomposition.
  • Stimulates the quick microbial decay of residual organic matter.
  • Prompts the quick release of nitrogen in the soil to create short-term yield benefits.
  • Increases fruit and vegetable yields.
  • Improves environmental impact by reducing the need for nitrogen amendments and promoting more CO2-absorbing foliage growth on plants and trees.
  • Reduces plant stress by applying phytochelates to foliage.
  • An excellent chelating agent, which means that it can help convert nutrients into a form that’s easily available for organisms and plants to use.
  • The best choice because it is the most nutritionally valuable of the various types of molasses as it contains the greatest concentration of sulphur, potassium, iron, micronutrients and trace minerals from the original cane material.
  • Contains high levels of potassium relative to nitrogen and phosphorus as well as vitamins and trace elements, including iron.
  • It is a liquid molasses that can be used alone, or as a component in both sprays and soil drenches, and can be an important addition to your organic fertilization program.
  • Is a carbon source and feeds the beneficial microbes creating greater natural plant fertility
  • Contains no preservative other than the high concentration of sugar. Black-strap molasses contains about 150 different kinds of sugars, from simple to somewhat complex to humics. During the extraction of sugar, heating results in condensation of the sugars into humic-like substances. The majority of foods in molasses are bacterial foods, but a few are fungal foods. Fungi tolerate high concentrations of sugar better than bacteria, so extremely high concentrations of molasses favour fungi. (Elaine Ingham)

 

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